Access Denied

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Description

 

Access Denied is a citizen reporting system enabling young people with disabilities in Palestine flag attitudinal and physical access issues.

 

Young people with disabilities (YPWD) are among the most socially excluded and vulnerable people in Palestine. They face high levels of poverty and discrimination and lack of access to basic services, particularly education, transportation, health, and employment opportunities. In the YMCA’s most recent survey, 70% of the estimated 85,000 physically disabled young people in the West Bank were unemployed, 73% had recently experienced discrimination and 74% felt unaware of their rights. While there is a recognition of the need for YPWD to access services and meaningful employment, the scale of the problem and the impact this has on young lives is not being captured in any meaningful way. Moreover, YPWD are often excluded from digital projects and generally lack modern tools to push for accountability.

 

Access Denied will allow YPWD to share SMS and/or voice alerts flagging attitudinal and physical access issues they encounter. Users will be able to submit reports with three elements: the barrier, the impact and their suggested solution. After being checked by an online monitoring team, the information can be shared in different ways including publishing reports to the Access Denied website, sending them as targeted emails to duty bearers, posting to social media, or tagging them for future action. Tools will aid commentary and engagement from groups including other YPWDs, community members, and duty bearers. It will also offer a space to highlight successes and the response, or lack of response, by duty bearers, and to galvanize public pressure via a simple e-petition. Reporters will be kept in the loop via SMS feedback.

 

This system will offer a dynamic means of recording accessibility issues in real time. It will support both the reporters and the duty bearers to better understand and respond to any rights violations. In addition, it will promote an evidence-based approach to advocacy, capturing public data regarding discrimination which can be used to strengthen campaigning and official reports. Most importantly, it will put YPWDs in control of their own solutions, challenging social stigma and traditional assumptions that PWDs need to be represented by others.

 

 

Prototype

 

 

 

The Team

 

Jen Blackwood, Programme Coordinator at Y Care International

Jen is an experienced project and grant manager, with three years’ experience of working with local partners in Palestine on youth livelihoods and advocacy. Jen will manage this project, ensuring that the YMCA and On Our Radar work together effectively to implement the project in line with best practice and the theory of change. She will provide technical support to monitor the progress and effectiveness of the activities and manage the budget.

 

Mahran Tawil, Project Coordinator at East Jerusalem YMCA

Mahran manages the disability programme and has strong relationships with local communities, CBOs, and local authorities which will be instrumental in this project. Mahran will manage the project activities in Palestine, focusing on training and support of the advocates and building community support for the initiative. He will liaise with On Our Radar to test the technology, manage the budget in country and monitor the progress with technical support from YCI.

 

Adam Groves, Senior Programme Manager at On Our Radar

Adam worked for six years managing the design and delivery of mobile and new media projects for OneWorld.org, before joining the Effectiveness Unit at Bond. Adam will oversee the deployment of the hub, supported by CEO, Libby Powell, who worked for five years as Programmes Coordinator for Medical Aid for Palestinians.

 

Corin Faife, Technical Development Manager at On Our Radar

Corin has 5 years’ experience working in digital media and as an educator in challenging environments. He has responsibility for gathering and synthesising user needs at the design phase, and steering technical projects from concept to development to implementation.

 

Tobias Quinn, Developer at On Our Radar

Tobias worked for 10 years as a software designer for a digital infrastructure company on TV broadcast engineering and studio automation hardware. He now leads development of the digital systems and service infrastructure for On Our Radar and will code the advocacy hub.

 

Budget

 

$10000

Comments

harrietknox's picture
A really innovative and exciting initiative tackling a critical issue for young people with disabilities living in Palestine: I hope we can turn this concept into a reality!
helenfrost's picture
A great concept which will engage a marginalised yet extremely resilient and strong group of young people within Palestine! The EJYMCA has amazing experience of engaging young people with disabilities and ensuring that young people can express themselves, work with their communities and empower themselves.
MA12's picture
This project will be changing lives - especially young people with disabilities who need a chance to change their lives for the better. Please help and create opportunities for young people in Palestine. Thank you
jrfemma's picture
This is a genuinely innovative and unique partnership ... East Jerusalam YMCA with support from Y Care International have been doing excellent work supporting young people with disabilities for years. The addition of On Our Radar, with their digital expertise and track record, is very exciting - with great potential for low-cost, digitally-enabled transformation. Check out the concept - and share your comment and support. Thank you!
Adam Leach's picture
This is a genuinely exciting initiative to create new opportunities for young people and to hear their voices. I am really thrilled to be working with our good partners, East Jerusalem YMCA & OnOurRadar, in this new and innovative action to enable young people in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. We urge - groups/advocates in Palestine to test the concept, government officials in Palestine to test the concept, groups and individuals with knowledge of Palestine to affirm the problem analysis, and value of testing this potential solution, and individuals/groups with experience of similar citizen engagement initiatives to affirm the value of this kind of action.
stevenbuckley's picture
This is a great initiative. I've seen SMS reporting work for civil society projects in Africa, the medium is quick, cheap and non-discrimanatory - but the information and accountability delivered is incredibly rich. I hope this proposal gets the funding it deserves and urge local groups to get involved.
Gshaw87's picture
This is a really exciting concept working with very marginalized groups in Palestine. I really hope this project receives the funding it deserves!
chrisclark's picture
This is a great idea. We have worked with Radar on another project and they are very professional in everything they do. I hope this gets the funding it deserves.
tompalmer44's picture
This is exactly the kind of initiative that I wish I was involved in. I have worked both in Palestine and on disability rights and I can certainly understand the need for an intervention like this. I also know Radar well having collaborated on another youth and disability project in West Africa. Disability projects in the OPT too often focus only physical rehabilitation and the rights promotion initiatives rarely include youth with disabilities. As such this kind of venture is vital to unlock the potential of a marginalised demographic and contribute to change in part of the world that could use a little less status quo. Good luck Radar!
Paulmyles's picture
Having worked on Channel 4 News' award winning 'No Go Britain' project, I've seen how citizen reporting around issues of access and disability can create real change. People with disabilities around the country were asked to flag access issues they were faced with, with a particular focus on transport in the UK. This project is a powerful and exciting idea that will leave an impact, not only on the services provided for people with disabilities, but also on the individual reporters themselves.
Y CAre International's picture
A great idea that will support young men and women with disabilities in Palestine to amplify their voices and use technology to lobby for their rights.
Nora_R's picture
This is an excellent project, working with the most vulnerable and getting thier stories out to the global community is so important!
IronsE11's picture
This looks like a great idea. I really hope you manage to secure the funding that a project like this deserves.
Hiba's picture
This is a wonderful idea, we should let all the world know about them, about their stories and suffering.. go on
Tararaecarey's picture
Sounds like a brilliant idea and having worked with On Our Radar I know they would do a great job at bringing it to life.
Kathryn Irwin's picture
A great idea that will provide way for marginalised young people to have a voice in issues that affect them and to challenge discrimination. I've seen the impact that this kind of approach can have and hope that the proposal will be successful.
NadaSavitch's picture
Such an important project. We have worked with Radar in the UK with people with dementia and their projects really do give real people a voice they wouldn't have had any other way.
jallen300's picture
Sounds like an amazing idea. At OneWorld, we'll be particularly interested to hear about how effective the project is at using the evidence generated from YPWDs to influence duty bearers and the policies they're responsible for. We're currently developing a project in Myanmar that also aims to collect stories from regular citizens and use them as evidence to advocate with duty bearers, so we will be able to learn a lot from your experiences in Palestine. I also think the project design is right on -- each actor seems to have a discreet, manageable role that feeds into or builds on what the others are doing, adding up to an outcome that none of the individual actors could ever achieve on their own. And the technology seems well suited to accomplish the goal of moving the information from one part of the chain to the next, with several different tech options at each potential choke point, ensuring the greatest chance that the person involved at that moment will be able and willing to move the process forward toward its ultimate goal. Really impressed by the how you've developed what seems likely to be an impactful, complex system, out of a series of relatively simple interactions with very usable technologies. Congrats on this -- I'm looking forward to hearing the results and lessons learned once you get it off the ground, so we can take those on board in our own citizen engagement projects in Myanmar and beyond!
WillTucker's picture
This looks really great - it's so important that stories from the most marginalised people in West Bank, such as those living with disability, are told both locally and more widely and that the lived experiences faced by people inform future policy making, as would be the case with the fact that this project will inform ongoing policy influencing undertaken by the East Jerusalem YMCA. Radar's experience delivering citizen reporting projects in numerous situations, combined with the local knowledge, partners and networks which the East Jerusalem YMCA will have will be a great match to get this project off the ground.
Seray Bangura's picture
This is an excellent idea. I am a person with a disability and have been a beneficiary of a similar initiative implemented in Sierra Leone by On Our Radar; it was a huge success turning youths with disabilities into reliable new contributors for the Guardian, BBC, Sky News and so on. No doubt, this will have great impact on the lives of persons with disabilities in Palestine. I hope this initiative gets the funding it really deserves.
arizonasmith's picture
I was trained by Radar via Kidscompany, and have since gone on to work on really exciting projects with this little team. Radar gave me the confidence and sounding board to enhance my journalistic and campaigning skill set enabling me to start to make tracks to be an active and effective voice in my community and beyond. I am very excited that Radar may start a programme in Palestine, I know Libby feels passionately about the area and I know how amazing and beneficial Radar's training is. Go Radar!
Cathy's picture
Brilliant idea, giving a voice to those who by no fault of their own are not heard. This project will undoubtedly change the lives of many and I hope it gets the funding it deserves.
roquejata's picture
I am a Citizen Journalist and a Community health advocates in Sierra Leone. I am grateful to Radar for their training in my country Sierra Leone which have inspire and empower us to feel that our voices can be heard and be impactful all around the world. As a young journalist I am happy to see the impact Radar has created in my career my involvement with them has explore my work to the world as they have helped me greatly in getting some of my article published on some of the World most renown media outlets like BBC, Channel 4, Huffinton post, The Guardians, Think Africa Press and more which has added great value to my CV. I now work for the Social Mobilisation Action Consortium SMAC, The largest Social Mobilisation Network in the Ebola Response working with over 2500 Community Mobilisers, 4000 religious leaders and 36 Local Radio Stations in the country through the BBC Media Action Sierra Leone, GOAL, Restless Development, FOCUSS100 and CDC. As the current SMAC Social Media Officer of SMAC I must confess that my working experience with On Our Radar made me stand out to be consider as the best candidate for the job during the recruitment process. I am sure this will be a great opportunity for the Palestine to explore their communities via the Media as we have demonstrated this during our past election and have still continue to explore the fact to counter the misinformation in the International media during the Ebola outbreak live from the ground were it happens with the support of On Our Radar.
roquejata's picture
I am a Citizen Journalist and a Community health advocates in Sierra Leone. I am grateful to Radar for their training in my country Sierra Leone which have inspire and empower us to feel that our voices can be heard and be impactful all around the world. As a young journalist I am happy to see the impact Radar has created in my career my involvement with them has explore my work to the world as they have helped me greatly in getting some of my article published on some of the World most renown media outlets like BBC, Channel 4, Huffinton post, The Guardians, Think Africa Press and more which has added great value to my CV. I now work for the Social Mobilisation Action Consortium SMAC, The largest Social Mobilisation Network in the Ebola Response working with over 2500 Community Mobilisers, 4000 religious leaders and 36 Local Radio Stations in the country through the BBC Media Action Sierra Leone, GOAL, Restless Development, FOCUSS100 and CDC. As the current SMAC Social Media Officer of SMAC I must confess that my working experience with On Our Radar made me stand out to be consider as the best candidate for the job during the recruitment process. I am sure this will be a great opportunity for the Palestine to explore their communities via the Media as we have demonstrated this during our past election and have still continue to explore the fact to counter the misinformation in the International media during the Ebola outbreak live from the ground were it happens with the support of On Our Radar.
Alice Williams's picture
This sounds like a fantastic project, a great way of using citizen journalism to raise the profile of this issue. I'm sure this project will be great and I look forward to seeing the results.
Diana Shaw's picture
Knowing the work of On Our Radar and their deep commitment to empowering people with disabilities to become citizen journalists, I wholeheartedly support this project. I have worked in both the media and development as well as the disability and development fields myself, and have seen how SMS technology has been used successfully in Palestine and by people with disabilities in many countries. In addition, the project team will contribute each organisation's expertise, which will help the project to be successful and effective. I hope that this initiative will get the funding it needs.
Nathanliu's picture
It's so easy for you and I to use the web to search for solutions or drive our own, but few have used the tools technology has given us in a such a forward thinking way that can help the most marginalised and stigmatised people on the planet. I wholeheartedly support a project that enables the Palistinian youth to take an active part in their future, while laying the groundwork for more innovations in remote communication and challenging a troubling status quo in the reason. Citizen Journalism is so much more than the term may suggest, and this project proves it.
TomiAjayi's picture
Having with worked with Radar on a citizen reporting project in Sierra Leone, I've seen how their unique approach not only supports marginalised communities to speak out in contexts where their views have often gone unheard, but also translates these views into advocacy, action and actual results. I think the current proposal has a lot of potential to do the same for young people living with disabilities in Palestine. It's definitely a concept worth investing in.
therealellis's picture
This sounds like an ideal project. I have met young people in the West Bank who have disabilities and who have had real boosts from having creative outlets through the YMCA, and heard that this has had positive knock ons though isolated in societal attitudes to YPWD. This project is a further step in empowering them with a voice to be their own advocates.
kieronm's picture
Terrific, empowering scheme that would gives a marginalised and stigmatised community opportunities to highlight the hidden inhumanities of Occupation, and everyone else the chance to learn from their unique experiences.
hannahwest's picture
Having worked as a personal carer for a man with muscular dystrophy, I have witnessed first hand the barriers (physically, socially and economically) people with disabilities face. Living in a conflict environment with hugh levels of insecurity provides further layers of complexity to many of these people. This initiative by Radar provides a voice for some of the most vulnerable people in our society, and an opportunity for them to be their own development agents and create sustainble solutions for generations to come. Radar have proved over and again their tremendous capacity to promote citizen engagement and tell the untold stories of our time. This project deserves to be funded and to be reproduced in other communities around the globe. Truly inspiring and I will follow its progress closely.
corinfaife's picture
Thanks a lot for your comment Tomi! We'll certainly be building on what we learned in Sierra Leone, and everyone on the team here is really excited about the prospect of applying it to Palestine.
corinfaife's picture
Thanks Tom - we'd love you to be involved in future! As you know, our whole ethos is based around increasing representation & decision-making by people marginalised by a range of circumstances, which is why we think there's so much potential with this group in the OPT.
corinfaife's picture
Thanks a lot for your comment Seray. It's been a privilege to work with you & other passionate young Sierra Leoneans around these issues, and we really hope to be able to have the same success in this new context.
Libby Powell's picture
We work with many people with disabilities who are living off-grid or who are unable to get online. We used the SMS hub to ask some of them about their experience of being a citizen reporter in parallel projects: "My name is Sulaiman ‘sixty’ Camara. I am a disabled person with polio. I was born in 1961 and I’m a French teacher. Presently, I live in the Magbenteh Polio camp. I am the secretary general of the Polio Persons Development Association, Makeni and a disability-rights activist. I was rather unfortunate, I was hospitalised for quite some time after I was dropped by a motorbike and fractured my foot, so presently I am using a wheelchair. It’s been almost a year now that I have been reporting for Radar. In our country here, if you are disabled, you are neglected; you are discriminated. But through the opportunity Radar has given to me, I am regarded as one of the most important people. I enjoy reporting for Radar a lot and my family are now highly respected”. “My name is Patrick Lahai, 27 years old. I am an IT professional in Bo and a double amputee. Ebola has been rather unfortunate and it has had a lot of impact on me and my family. Before Radar, I didn’t know anything about reporting. I have learnt a lot about how to be a reporter; it has boosted knowledge in me. It’s really exciting reporting as a person with a disability"
Deebz's picture
I have worked with disabled children during my time as a project leader for a local charity in the UK. Barriers to young disabled people exists even here, so the work and impact of Radar is commendable. Good luck with Access Denied in driving forward change in the world.
tulinele's picture
Working in war torn countries over the past few years I have witnessed tremendous suffering but what touches me most is the marginalisation of disabled people. In addition to the standard hardships faced (poverty, food insecurity, unemployment) I have seen the way young disabled people are hidden and forgotten about in communities while families carry the burden in silence. Access Denied is a fantastic initiative to change the stigma attached to disabilities and prove to the community and to YPWD themselves their self worth by giving them a voice as well as advocating for the issues that matter most. This project should be funded, especially with RADARs dynamic team and talents I have no doubt it will be a success. And what great place for it to begin than in Palestine where many young lives have been affected through years of war and violence.
lala a's picture
I work with children and adolescents with both physical and mental disabilities. Despite awareness of the obstacles that face the disabled community, there is still little practical awareness of the invisible social and professional margins imposed. I work with young adults who have been ostracised from their peers, community and most frighteningly, their schools, since little is known on how to appropriately address their needs or even identify the needs alone. In the long run, affecting the quality of life, in all aspects. Neglecting the paramount issues faced is detrimental to what we hold to be one of the primary human rights. We need projects like this to ensure that such rights are protected publicly, persistently and explicitly.
cmickle's picture
This sounds like a great project. The prototype chart is really helpful in visualising the project and shows you've really thought through how this impacts different parties and how they can communicate. I have first hand experience with young people with disabilities and completely recognise the difficulties of reaching out for support. I would be very interested to see this project progress.
LKJIvil's picture
Nkaiso Akpan, Rivers State, Nigeria, and Damasus Henry, Delta State, Nigeria, were both trained as citizen journalists by On Our Radar in November 2014. Today, via Whatsapp, they shared their own thoughts on the “Access Denied” project concept. Nkaiso Akpan: “On Our Radar, in training youths in citizen journalism have empowered people whom, through hard work, can empower others. Citizen reporters are always at the centre of the storm and so they know the extent of devastation, and the disabled are in the best position to tell their stories here. Every community needs basic infrastructures like water, good schools, roads, light e.t.c. Where this basic amenity is lacking, the people suffer great/untold hardship. My reporting through On Our Radar, first of all, exposes the challenge of the remotest parts of the world to the International community, thereby putting them on the International development agenda. It is a beautiful idea.” Damasus Henry: “I think that it is a good idea, it will going a long way, not only in Palestine, but all war effected areas. With On Our Radar, the world hears my community stories without them being painted the way the government wants it. The value of citizen reporters is to get the truth right from the original sources. With all my heart I would love Palestinians to tell their stories without fear nor favour.”
Helenasand's picture
This project will be helping one of the most vulnerable groups, often ignored and forgotten. It will help young people with disabilities who need a chance to change their lives for the better. Please help and create opportunities for young people in Palestine! Thank you!
paulahamako's picture
This project sounds very innovative, interesting & important. Training YPWD to become reporters would be a way to ensure that those groups who traditionally would not necessarily have a platform to get their stories and concerns heard will have that crucial opportunity. Having worked with On Our Radar before I can confirm that they are a highly professional, imaginative and ethical team, who have wide experience working with vulnerable people and training citizen reporters.
Alice T-D's picture
Having worked with the Radar team over last summer I am familiar with their incredible work and this looks like another excellent project. I was working with the team when a young reporter from Sierra Leone, Moses, made it onto Channel 4 News and the BBC with his excellent reports on the Ebola outbreak in his region. These successes gave Moses and his remote community a voice which would not have been heard otherwise. Young disabled people in Palestine are perhaps an even more marginalised group, so working to engage them in this project would be an important further step.
EmilySayer's picture
Access Denied has the potential to develop a sustainable and innovative communication channel and long lasting impact for some of the most vulnerable people in Palestine. It is an important project which I hope gets the support it deserves.
Oscar's picture
I've been following Radar from the beginning. I love the projects they have done, like citizen reporting project in Sierra Leone. I have no doubt that much of the success has been the team that is working on Radar. This new challenge seems like a great project that will help and create opportunities for people in Palestine. Good luck Radar Team!
LKJIvil's picture
This evening citizen reporters working in parallel projects contacted On Our Radar via Whatsapp to add to the comments of their peers sent earlier today. Mohamed Camara, Susan’s Bay Slum, Freetown - Sierra Leone: “The On Our Radar project makes you a voice of the voiceless and help brings the hidden facts about your society by training you how to report on issues affecting your society and publishing it for you to the world.” Bintu, Freetown - Sierra Leone: “On Our Radar help the disabled youth also to be part of the society. Radar create self employment and close the gap between the society. Glaad Amadi, Rivers State - Nigeria: “Working with On Our Radar, it is an education to me. It is a boldness to meet with people you never expected to meet in life. It is difficult some times in life for people to hear your voice. It's a good idea On Our Radar supporting disabled youths in Palestine. Maybe they face the same challenges Nigeria faces as room isn’t given to them, their voices are not heard in the communities.”
Miriamj's picture
This is a really exciting project giving a voice to young disabled people in Palestine who are rarely heard. A great use of citizen reporting to speak out about issues and attitudes which blight their lives and which may therefore lead to improvements. Access denied is an innovative project which through training and support allows previously overlooked and unheard young people to begin to make changes to improve their lives.
Anton's picture
we are looking to use and implement this idea, great work , wow, the disable people are in need to such great work
mirass01's picture
Great Idea
Carol Zoughbi Janineh's picture
This is an innovative initiative that brings a new approach to serving YPWD's in Palestine. Quite different from the regular rehabilitation projects that have been implemented lately. Hopefully proper funding can be secured.

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Y Care International works in over 20 countries worldwide, changing young lives through local YMCAs...
I am Asia, Middle East and Latin America Programme Coordinator at Y Care International.
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